The Ontario Center of Excellence, along with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, is funding a new grant with a value of 45,000 Canadian dollars (around US$35,000) for a CBD-related product. This grant, funded by their respective departments — Voucher for Innovation and Productivity and the engage program — is directed towards innovative yeasts.

This yeast research program is moving towards the creation of beers using hemp and cannabis as core ingredients. However, far from being a simple gimmick, this research should lead to the creation and development of cutting edge time-saving technology.

Lead by researchers from Province Brands of Canada, an R&D IP Generation Company, and from Western University, a public research university hailing from Ontario, this program should lead to, in the researcher’s own words, a “new brewing tradition.” Dr. Lars Rehmann, hailing from Western University, pointed out that the application of cutting-edge tools and the general advancement of agriculture will lead the cannabis industry to rapidly evolve.

Dr. Rehmann further commented on the fact that the cooperation between universities and innovative companies, such as in this specific situation, lead to the creation of an exciting environment for both graduates and entrepreneurs. Furthermore, collaborations such as these can lead to out of the box solutions to many industrial problems.

On the business side of things, the CEO of Province Brands of Canada, Dooma Wendschuh, is also optimistic. She recognizes how promising this type of cooperation can be, and claims that Province Brands of Canada is “fortunate” to be cooperating with the Western University team.

Province Brands of Canada has been working hard on creating a new brewing process for beer made from cannabis. Their patent-pending process requires special equipment and tech that does not actually exist in breweries at the moment. It is supposed to extract fermentable sugars from cannabis plants, allowing for the creation of hemp beers.

The potential patent-pending technology, along with the yeast whose development is being funded by the aforementioned grant, may just lead to the arrival of an interesting new product on our markets.