Today, with the expansion of cannabis legalization, users are no longer the subject of scrutiny and legal penalties (at least in places where cannabis is legalized). Instead, they can now consume cannabis publicly (at their own discretion) which calls for new cannabis etiquette that reflects the current needs of the society.

American author Lizzie Post, the great-great-granddaughter of the American etiquette expert Emily Post, wrote the book “Higher Etiquette: A Guide to the World of Cannabis, From Dispensaries to Dinner Parties” to serve this purpose.

Unlike her predecessor, Emily, the author of “Etiquette” (1922), who neither smoked or drank, Lizzie openly admits that she is, in fact, a “stoner.” Her book not only educates and spreads awareness on the subject of cannabis use but it also sets out to erase the shame associated with regular cannabis consumption.

“Higher Etiquette” for example, explains the correct ways of inviting people to a cannabis buffet and provides instructions on how to host and organize them for the mutual enjoyment of everyone, regardless of their consumption habits.

In addition to her personal experience, the book is fueled by existing literature, as well as the experience of famous authors and experts on the subject. This makes for a well-rounded, indispensable guide for newbies and regular users alike.  

One of the most important things cannabis smokers have to keep in mind, according to Lizzie, is to treat their smoke as they would a cigarette smoke — in other words, keeping it out of the faces of other people. Furthermore, cannabis lovers should avoid smoking weed in front of children.

Fascinated by the openness of the cannabis culture, which is always ready to welcome new members, Post stresses that sharing a joint is the perfect time for showing good manners — or the so-called passing etiquette — that is unique and extremely important for the cannabis community.

Post doesn’t always adhere to the usage of the terms “marijuana” or “weed,” which, according to their respective origins, point to vulgar and negative connotations. Instead, she prefers the term cannabis.   

Exploring the polite usage of every type of cannabis, such as edibles, cannabis cocktails and, of course, joints, the author says that this guidebook is also intended as an argument for the cannabis culture’s dignity and a way to celebrate cannabis consumption openly.