A new streaming service will be available on January 15, 2020, devoted entirely to cannabis and everyone’s favorite cannabinoid — CBD. 

Social Club TV, a project announced back in August by Joshua Otten — co-founder of the cannabis lifestyle brand PRØHBTD and CEO of the content service and distribution agency Ronin — will be distributed to more than 100 million households across Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Prime, Android TV, and iOS, becoming the largest network devoted to cannabis-related programming.

The network is currently available on Pluto TV’s THC Channel — an ad-supported streaming service owned by ViacomCBS (free of charge) — while a subscription-based service will be launched in 2020 for viewers who want access to exclusive content.  

Part of this exclusive content includes new shows like “Pot Pie” and “Marijuana Mania,” as well as over 200 hours of original programming dedicated to cannabis, ranging from comedy to true crime, even cooking shows. According to Otten, the company is set to generate over $4 million in revenue in 2020 as a result of increasing mainstream demand for cannabis content. 

Apparently, people love watching cannabis-related programming. 

Dope State,” one of Social Club TV’s top shows, has been on the air for almost 5 years (since 2015) and has amassed over 50 million minutes watched. Written and directed by Gabriel Sunday, “Dope State” is a mockumentary on California’s cannabis culture and deals with the modern-day gold rush of entrepreneurs trying to make it in the pot business. 

Other hit shows, like HBO’s “High Maintenance” and “Disjointed,” as well as documentaries like “Grass is Greener” on Netflix, are moving away from programs that feature the stoner stereotype to more sensitive issues such as the relationship between cannabis legalization and the criminal justice system. Another Netflix documentary, “Weed the People,” focuses on the role of medical cannabis in health care, particularly how legalization impacts cancer patients. 

Data shows that cannabis-friendly content is increasing at twice the rate of other (more traditional) genres, such as rom-com and sci-fi. With over a million households in the US streaming cannabis-related programs last year and a 42.7% increase in total streamed hours for cannabis-focused shows between 2018 and 2019, it seems that cannabis is slowly but surely taking over streaming platforms.